The age of Conversation

 

 

Thanks for stopping by and joining in the conversation. It is good to share this space with you. After all, a monologue would be rather tedious  for me, whereas a dialogue is far more interesting and stimulating – don’t you agree?

The girl pictured above look absorbed in her book. Reading tends to be a rather solitary pursuit but the information absorbed cries out to be shared with others.

In this age of mass communication we have never before had so many opportunities to ‘talk’ to one another. Yet how easy it is to offer only scant attention…..hello, are you still there?…. to one another.

As our attention spans have shrunk, our ability to concentrate, focus and really ‘listen’ to others has suffered accordingly. So I’ll try not to keep you too long. I’d love you to simply pause a moment to reflect on these thoughts.

“Given the crush of technology, email, social media and the 24-hour news, most of us react and decide too quickly” ~ Frank Partnoy (author of ‘Wait’)
My poem below centres on the theme of listening and being there for one another.

Just talking

 

Pale suspension as liquid tones of
conversation
trickle
in our ears
Tell me, do we ever really listen to
each other’s
sighs and dreams?
Or do we use a social smile
fresh-freezered
in our hearts?
Maybe that is why we find that
love
just goes on by
©JoyLenton2012

 

I would love to hear your thoughts and comments on this topic. So please feel free to ‘join the conversation’. More on this theme to follow soon.

3 Comments

  1. I think that the more opportunities we have for ways of having conversations, the more fleeting and (sometimes) shallow they are. On the other hand, there's opportunity to talk to people you wouldn't normally come across. Swings and ….!

  2. Thanks for taking time to respond, Fran, and for reassuring me that I am not simply talking to myself! You raise a valid point. Without social media we wouldn't even be having this 'conversation'. It certainly has its place. My concern is that we could become so used to giving scant attention to so many things at once that we might fail to 'tune in' to those who really matter to us.

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